Southwest Airlines offering in-flight iMessage access for $2

§ December 12th, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

With your iPhone or iPad you’re already able to use iMessage on in-flight WiFi in the U.S. already, but Southwest Airlines is today making it easier for its passengers by offering a new, reduced rate iMessage only plan. Until now, keeping in touch with your iMessage buddies on the plane has required the purchase of a full WiFi package, but starting today for just $2 Southwest passengers can forego this and just get their iMessage on.

For folks who need to keep in touch while they flight this is a great option without the added cost of a full WiFi package, and Southwest has also said that it will be looking at extending the service to some Android messaging services in the future. Any Southwest flyers out there attracted to this new deal?

Source: Southwest Airlines


    







Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/WF-6pHibSOI/story01.htm
Tags: alec baldwin   Hunter Hayes   Batman Arkham Origins   Witches of East End   Brian Hoyer  

‘Amazing Spider-Man 2′: All The Best Moments From The New Trailer

§ December 6th, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

From Doctor Octopus, to an Avengers crossover?


By Alex Zalben

Source:

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1718527/the-amazing-spider-man-2-trailer-best-moments.jhtml


Tags: Katherine Webb   japan earthquake   downton abbey  

Growing up Geek: Timothy J. Seppala

§ December 1st, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

Welcome to Growing Up Geek, an ongoing feature where we take a look back at our youth and tell stories of growing up to be the nerds that we are. Today, we have our very own Timothy J. Seppala.

I was 7 years old the first time I read Jaws. I was in second grade, and like most boys that age, I was absurdly fascinated by sharks and dinosaurs. I still am. What made me want to read it was spending an afternoon watching the flick on LaserDisc with my dad. By the time the end credits rolled, I was filled with a sense of wonder that I still get when I watch it on Blu-ray. It left me wanting more, though, so I checked the novel out from the library.

I don’t remember how long it took me to read, but I recall not being able to put it down; it was unlike anything I’d ever encountered before. Mostly because it was an adult novel and I was still a kid. There was blood! There was swearing! There were entire chapters written from a shark’s perspective! After finishing it, there was no way I could go back to the steady diet of whatever it was my classmates were reading, so I skipped youth fiction almost entirely. My next read was Jurassic Park. After that, the rest of Crichton’s and Benchley’s works kept me busy until high school where I discovered Tolkien and King.

After spending a weekend with my aunt as a kid, I came home and found my dad excitedly setting up that aforementioned Pioneer LaserDisc player, which he’d just purchased. For better or for worse, this moment helped turn me into an early adopter, and in retrospect, that gargantuan gadget was the gateway drug to my geekiness. Through that massive contraption I was exposed to Star Trek, Star Wars and Flight of the Navigator. There may or may not have been a summer break where I watched A New Hope and Spielberg’s tale of shark and man once a day, every day.

There was always new audio/video gear in the house when I was growing up. My dad played in a rock and roll cover band on the weekends and liked living on the cutting edge of technology. While I may not exactly care for dusting now, as a kid it was always fun for me because it meant I was actually allowed to touch all of his rad equipment. I’d haphazardly arrange the umpteen sliders and switches on his rack-mountable equalizer into some cool looking pattern that assuredly sounded like garbage. I’d hit the power button on his Yamaha tape deck because I loved the frictional push of it. The analog needles bouncing to life and the warm glow that peeked out from the viewing windows of dad’s Onkyo stereo receiver as it turned on always made me smile.

My A/V obsession fully blossomed in the summer of 2007 when my dad brought home our first HDTV, a 51-inch Hitachi F59A rear-projection CRT. Still, it wasn’t until I’d connected the PlayStation 3 he’d bought as a family Christmas present that year that we had a great HD source to judge its picture. Saying I was disappointed in the TV’s image quality would have been an understatement. A fateful Google search led me to AVSForum and an incredibly helpful group who guided me through the arcane ins and outs of service menu tweaks. Before long, I was adjusting DCAM convergence and RGB cuts and drives like a pro. After about six months, I was finally happy with all of the work I’d done while my parents were either asleep or out of the house.

I foolishly thought this knowledge would carry over when I got my first HDTV (a tiny 19-inch Samsung LCD), but I was sorely mistaken. After I’d nuked my second or third TV by pressing the wrong button within the service menu, I resolved to stop futzing where I didn’t belong. Sam’s Club may have had a one-year “no hassle” return policy on HDTVs, but it didn’t stop the customer service reps’ disapproving stares as I’d swapped out each successive display for the next size up, as money would allow.

Along the journey to my dream TV, I somehow managed talking my parents into buying one of the 50-inch Pioneer Kuros that Sam’s was closing out at a deep discount. To this day, it still has the best overall picture of any TV I’ve ever seen. It wasn’t until I’d finally traded up to a plasma of my own — a 42-inch Panasonic — that I was satisfied with my personal TV.

When I look at my A/V rack, I can’t help but think of my dad’s influences. Up top floats a TV that barely fits on its hanger. Below, there’s a hulking Onkyo receiver. Five gaming consoles — three of which double as Blu-ray players, and four bought on their respective launch days — round it all out and stacks of physical media flank the stand. I may not have my own LaserDisc player, but I’ve definitely been on the wrong side of tech trends. For example, I own a Sega Game Gear, a Nintendo 64 and a Halo 3 edition Microsoft Zune. You could say I was thinking differently before it was cool.

It was after I asked for the crappy, off-brand competitor to Excitebike 64 for my birthday one year that I started paying attention to video game reviews. However, I’d never entertained the notion that writing about games was a valid career choice until some time later, when I started listening to gaming podcasts on my Zune (it wasn’t wasted money after all!). I initially subscribed to about half a dozen gaming shows, but it was “1UP Yours” that eventually won my heart and my limited listening time. Garnett, Shane, John and the weekly guest welcomed me into their world and after a few years, I didn’t want to leave. I saw my chance to start writing about games in 2009 while I was taking pre-business classes at community college and working at my dad’s body shop.

My first assignment as a reporter? Covering the midnight release of Grand Theft Auto IV for my hometown (and Michigan’s then-second-largest daily) newspaper, The Grand Rapids Press. That unpaid web story led to paying print work and a blogging arrangement, the latter of which was invaluable training for developing my tone and style. I even had the chance to interview Garnett and John from “1UP Yours,” along with other editors I admired, as sources for a few articles. It was surreal hearing their voices on the other end of the phone and actually talking with them instead of passively listening.

In the half-decade before I joined Engadget, I found that I enjoyed my work most when I was pushing myself to take a different angle, or find one where others couldn’t. Whether I was interviewing a Deftone, a drag queen or digging deep into my city’s craft-brewing history, I worked tirelessly (often sleeplessly) to stay well-rounded as a journalist. It’s acclimated me to longer word counts, and forced me to trust my instincts.

Onboard the Deftones tour bus (pre-journalist days) with a friend and Chino. Yes, I have big hands.

When I was writing about video games exclusively, I liked sidestepping the standard preview and review cycle to keep myself challenged. Places like Ars Technica, PCWorld, Sound & Vision and the late GamePro allowed me to explore the reasons behind shrinking play length, determine where game sound is going in the next gen, interview countless art and audio directors and delve into the trend behind games having predominantly brown color palettes, respectively. I like to think these assignments are what shaped me as a writer the most.

This is what I brought with me to Engadget. It’s this type of work that keeps me excited as a writer, and I hope it entices you as a reader too. If you dug my feature on Electronic Arts’ Frostbite game engine, that was just the beginning — I hope you enjoy the ride because it isn’t stopping anytime soon.

Timothy’s favorite Katy Perry song is definitely “Birthday,” and you can follow him on Twitter @TimSeppala.

 Comments

Source: http://feeds.engadget.com/~r/weblogsinc/engadget/~3/4OgjYYVTd30/
Tags: rudolph the red nosed reindeer   Mexico vs New Zealand   eric church   cher   Most Receiving Yards In A Game  

Qualcomm now taking preorders for Toq smartwatch

§ November 26th, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

Qualcomm Toq

Price is set at $349, includes wireless charging dock

Qualcomm has opened preorders for the Toq smartwatch, offering the black model for $350 and shipping in 1-3 weeks. We first heard about the Toq last September, when Qualcomm clearly perched it against the Galaxy Gear. Promising a better screen and better battery life than the Gear, as well as compatibility with any brand of Android smartphone, they made no qualms about calling the Gear out by name.

The 1.5-inch Mirasol display is always-on, and said to be visible without any back lighting. Combined with full use of the AllJoyn Notification Framework, the Toq sounds like the perfect wearable for a budding developer or technology junkie.

But the $349 price tag is going to be hard to swallow for many, and while the hardware and software are intriguing, it's not likely to fare well against models from other manufacturers with much smaller price tags. We get the feeling that while Qualcomm would enjoy huge retail success, they are going after the developer market with this one.

For more information, and to preorder a Toq for yourself, see the link below.

Source: Qualcomm Toq store


    







Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/androidcentral/~3/TgBiQUsldtY/story01.htm
Category: Haim   Geno Smith   Alexian Lien   GTA Online   BlackBerry  

Jennifer Lawrence Addresses All Those Hospital Rumors At NYC ‘Catching Fire’ Premiere

§ November 21st, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

Actress talks to MTV News about why the end of ‘Hunger Games’ will turn her into a ‘crazy lady.’


By Sophie Schillaci, with reporting by Josh Horowitz

Source:

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1717851/jennifer-lawrence-addresses-hospital-rumors-catching-fire.jhtml


Category: Melissa Bachman   Saola   Humble Bundle   jimi hendrix   engadget  

Xerox aims to help enterprises curb remote printing costs with new tools, services

§ November 18th, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

Xerox is offering managed service tools for enterprises that want to reduce the costs of remote printing.

Xerox has added features to its Mobile Print app and bundled more security and audit tools so the app can be easily incorporated within existing managed print services in enterprises, the company said Monday. From PCs or mobile devices, users will be able to print documents at remote locations, but the cost and volume of the printing will be monitored by managed-print service administrators.

[ For a quick, smart take on the news you'll be talking about, check out InfoWorld Tech Brief -- subscribe today. ]

The features and tools are part of Xerox’s “next-generation managed printing services strategy,” said Mike Feldman, president of Large Enterprise Operations at Xerox. The strategy revolves around improving print security, reducing costs, and better utilizing printing and imaging devices in an infrastructure.

Enterprises will be able to track, report and manage documents printed at public locations such as UPS stores, Feldman said. It’s more expensive to print documents at public locations, but companies will be able to better assess costs and negotiate better contracts on such services, Feldman said.

Xerox already had a mobile print strategy, but now is also weaving in more audit and security features so cloud printing fits easily into managed print services infrastructures at enterprises. Enhancements to the Mobile Print app include the ability to securely print from SD cards and using maps to find authorized printers globally, Feldman said. System administrators will be able to track the type of document being printed and enable secure printing.

Remote printing services have been available through companies like Hewlett-Packard and Google, but Xerox is extending it to enterprise print services, Feldman said.

Xerox is also offering “production assessment” services so that using a set of tools customers can analyze paper volume and types of equipment, and get recommendations on how to cut costs and improve utilization of printers and copiers.

Customers can also test printing and imaging infrastructure to meet specific security policies through a new Print Security Audit tool. The tool checks the security of connected devices, printers and documents in a managed print infrastructure. For example, the tool can send alerts to ensure passwords on connected devices are changed every 90 days. The security tool also can be used for cloud printing services.

Xerox for the first time is also offering to take over the management of print services from enterprises, Feldman said. The company manages entire IT operations for many companies, but Feldman said it can manage only print services for companies that want to manage IT internally. The printer server management service is available in western European countries immediately and will be available in the U.S. by the end of next year’s first quarter.

All of the other products and services are immediately available in the U.S., Canada, western Europe and some other emerging markets.

Agam Shah covers PCs, tablets, servers, chips and semiconductors for IDG News Service. Follow Agam on Twitter at @agamsh. Agam’s email address is agam_shah@idg.com

Source: http://podcasts.infoworld.com/d/mobile-technology/xerox-aims-help-enterprises-curb-remote-printing-costs-new-tools-services-230655?source=rss_mobile_technology
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Zoho lures Salesforce customers with new enterprise CRM features

§ November 15th, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

Zoho has added a series of features to its CRM (customer relationship management) software in a bid to appeal to larger companies as well as lure away customers from the likes of Salesforce.com.

In some respects, the Zoho update amounts to the company catching up to Salesforce.com and others rather than showcasing truly new innovations.

[ Discover what's new in business applications with InfoWorld's Technology: Applications newsletter. | Get the latest insight on the tech news that matters from InfoWorld's Tech Watch blog. ]

Zoho CRM Enterprise now includes improved territory management, allowing customers to be broken up by factors such as geographic area and revenue, allowing sales teams to hone their efforts around specific groups of prospects. In addition, Zoho has added the ability to run sales forecasts according to geography.

Larger companies with multiple divisions and lines of business may also need more than a standard set of CRM modules. To meet this need, Zoho CRM Enterprise now includes the ability to create custom modules that are compatible with the standard set.

Zoho has also taken a page from Salesforce.com by integrating customer Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter profiles directly inside the Zoho CRM interface. Salespeople and customer support representatives can keep an eye on the social streams, looking for signs of discontent, then respond directly to the person offering help, said Raju Vegesna, chief evangelist for Zoho.

Other improvements include better integration between Zoho CRM and Zoho Campaigns.

The updates are available now. Zoho CRM Enterprise costs $35 per user per month, a price that significantly undercuts Salesforce.com’s Enterprise package, which runs $125 per month.

Salesforce.com and its adherents may argue there’s no straight comparison to be made between it and Zoho. But Zoho is nonetheless finding success for its CRM, with more than 40,000 paying customers, according to Vegesna. Between 10 percent and 20 percent are using the Enterprise edition, and Zoho is completing about 30 migrations per day to its system, “typically from Salesforce.com and Microsoft Dynamics,” he claimed.

Zoho’s announcement comes just days before Salesforce.com kicks off its annual Dreamforce conference in San Francisco, and days after SugarCRM also announced a major update to its product.

Chris Kanaracus covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Chris’ email address is Chris_Kanaracus@idg.com

Source: http://akamai.infoworld.com/d/applications/zoho-lures-salesforce-customers-new-enterprise-crm-features-230878?source=rss_applications
Tags: tampa bay buccaneers   dia de los muertos   Cal Worthington   djokovic   Linda Ronstadt  

Amazon rolls out Kindle store and devices in Australia

§ November 13th, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

Kindle Fire HDX

Amazon wants to deliver more smiles to the land down under

Amazon has announced the availability of both the Kindle store and Kindle devices for their Australian customers. The new store will offer more than 2,000,000 eBooks, with more than 26,000 being free English-language titles. Customers will be able to choose from more than 700,000 books priced at $3.99AU or less, and more than 1,400,000 titles at $9.99AU or less. To round out the news, independent authors can now use Kindle Direct Publishing to make their books available, and earn the standard 70-percent royalty in the Kindle store.

To read all these books, you need a capable device, and for accessing the Kindle store none are more capable than a Kindle proper. The Kindle Fire HD is available now at Dick Smith and Big W stores across Australia for $189AU. The Kindle Fire HDX in both the 7 and 8.9-inch models will be available from Dick Smith and Big W as well, with the 7-inch model coming November 26 for $329AU, and the 8.9-inch version coming December 10 for $479.

While most of what we call Android has been stripped from the Kindle family, the devices themselves are great for reading. We're happy to see Amazon expanding into Australia. For full details, see the source links.

Source: Amazon (1); (2); (3)


    







Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/androidcentral/~3/ySPoP_W-lyc/story01.htm
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How secure was Lavabit’s ‘secure’ email? Not very, says researcher

§ November 9th, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

How secure was Lavabit's 'secure' email? Not very, says researcher

Credit: Jonathan Lim Yong Hian

After secure email provider Lavabit shuttered its services, security researcher Moxie Marlinspike took a closer look at its proffered services. What he saw didn’t give him a lot of confidence.

But the founder of Lavabit, Ladar Levinson, has taken to Ars Technica to publish a rebuttal of Marlinspike’s critique.

At the heart of the argument is a tough question: How much security, and of what kind, should be expected from a company that provides “secure” email — or, for that matter, “secure” anything? Especially when email is so inherently hard to secure?

Lavabit: Insecure by design?
Moxie’s critique revolves around the exact mechanics of the way emails were encrypted, stored, and retrieved by the user. What bothered him was the lack of verifiability in the system and how the system wasn’t designed to really uphold the standards of privacy and security it touted.

“The ciphertext, key, and password,” Marlinspike wrote, “are all stored on the server using a mechanism that is solely within the server’s control and which the client has no ability to verify. There is no way to ever prove or disprove whether any encryption was ever happening at all, and whether it was or not makes little difference. … Even though they advertised that they ‘can’t’ read your email, what they meant was that they would choose not to.”

Marlinspike also took exception to the way the password supplied by the user also does double duty as an encryption key, a practice frowned upon by password researchers. TrueCrypt, the disk-encryption system that’s currently the subject of a crowdfunded independent security audit, uses passwords to generate and secure an encryption key, which is in turn used to decode data. (The password itself isn’t a key.)

Because of these issues, Marlinspike couldn’t recommend contributing to a crowdfunded effort to open-source Lavabit’s system, one spearheaded by Levinson himself.

The definition of “secure”
Levinson also took exception to the way Marlinspike had characterized Lavabit’s services. In his op-ed, Levinson pointed out: “Marlinspike is assuming that the Lavabit system was designed to be a substitute for the security provided by end-to-end encryption systems like PGP. It was not. Lavabit’s encrypted storage feature was designed solely to protect e-mails at rest.”

But the real issue isn’t whether Marlinspike assumed such things. It’s whether Lavabit’s users — previous, current, and future — would have made those assumptions.

Levinson points out that Lavabit described in its own documentation how it only secured email at rest and how the end-user was responsible for providing his or her own transport security.

That by itself may not have been enough. End-users need and expect security to be deployed in a package that has as few moving parts as possible. Sadly, the current state of email doesn’t permit end-to-end security without a huge hassle, so Levinson might well have been forced to choose between an easier but less secure implementation or a more secure but increasingly complex one.

Such end-to-end security is what Levinson is more or less promising in part with his future project Dark Mail, a combination of open mail-handling protocols on the server side and open source software for end-users. But Dark Mail is no more than an idea right now, and a lot of work would be needed by many parties to make it happen.

Both men are in agreement about one detail: Email is inherently insecure and needs to be reworked from the ground up. How that’ll happen is where they part company — but nothing says they couldn’t join forces in the future.

This article, “How secure was Lavabit’s ‘secure’ email? Not very, says researcher,” was originally published at InfoWorld.com. Get the first word on what the important tech news really means with the InfoWorld Tech Watch blog. For the latest business technology news, follow InfoWorld.com on Twitter.

Source: http://www.infoworld.com/t/encryption/how-secure-was-lavabits-secure-email-not-very-says-researcher-230531?source=rss_applications
Category: olivia wilde   Texas A&m   Windows 8.1   joe flacco   vince young  

Drilling for hydrocarbons can impact aquatic life

§ November 7th, 2013 § Filed under hail § No Comments

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Kallie Huss
onepress@plos.org
415-568-3162
Public Library of Science


Drilling sumps can leak into surface water


The degradation of drilling sumps associated with hydrocarbon extraction can negatively affect aquatic ecosystems, according to new research published November 6th in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Joshua Thienpont and colleagues at Queen’s University and other institutions.

Hydrocarbons are a primary source of energy as combustible fuel. Although hydrocarbon exploration and extraction are profitable enterprises, hydrocarbons contribute to the formation of greenhouse gases and are therefore a major stressor to the environment.

During the process of exploring for hydrocarbons, drilling sumps are used to permanently store the waste associated with drilling. In the Mackenzie Delta region of Canada’s western Arctic, more than 150 drilling sumps were constructed for this purpose. Although the areas surrounding the sumps were believed to be frozen by the surrounding permafrost, recent findings suggest that these areas may actually be thawing. In this study, the authors examine the environmental effects of this type of drilling sump containment loss in the Mackenzie Delta.

Because drilling fluids are saline, they tested whether leakage to surface waters was occurring by measuring changes in conductivity, as saline is more conductive than pure water. They also hypothesized that if saline-rich wastes from drilling sumps were impacting lakes, there should be changes in the types of life forms present. Zooplankton, for example, are a key component of aquatic ecosystems and various species survive differently in saline versus fresh water.



Through an analysis of lake sediments, they found changes in the community composition of zooplankton due to sump degradation. These results suggest that climate change and permafrost thaw can have deleterious consequences to aquatic life through the degradation and leaking of drilling sumps.

Thienpont elaborates, “The leaching of wastes from drilling sumps represents a newly identified example of one of the cumulative impacts of recent climate change impacting the sensitive freshwater ecosystems of the Arctic.”

###

Citation: Thienpont JR, Kokelj SV, Korosi JB, Cheng ES, Desjardins C, et al. (2013) Exploratory Hydrocarbon Drilling Impacts to Arctic Lake Ecosystems. PLoS ONE 8(11): e78875. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078875

Financial Disclosure: This work was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada through Discovery grants to MFJP, JMB and JPS, and an NSERC Northern Supplement to MFJP. The Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP) also provided logistical support to MFJP. The cumulative impact monitoring program (CIMP) provided support for collection of water chemistry results. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interest Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

PLEASE LINK TO THE SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT (URL goes live after the embargo ends): http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0078875

Disclaimer: This press release refers to upcoming articles in PLOS ONE. The releases have been provided by the article authors and/or journal staff. Any opinions expressed in these are the personal views of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of PLOS. PLOS expressly disclaims any and all warranties and liability in connection with the information found in the release and article and your use of such information.

About PLOS ONE: PLOS ONE is the first journal of primary research from all areas of science to employ a combination of peer review and post-publication rating and commenting, to maximize the impact of every report it publishes. PLOS ONE is published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS), the open-access publisher whose goal is to make the world’s scientific and medical literature a public resource.

All works published in PLOS ONE are Open Access. Everything is immediately availableto read, download, redistribute, include in databases and otherwise usewithout cost to anyone, anywhere, subject only to the condition that the original authors and source are properly attributed. For more information about PLOS ONE relevant to journalists, bloggers and press officers, including details of our press release process and our embargo policy, see the everyONE blog at http://everyone.plos.org/media.



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[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Kallie Huss
onepress@plos.org
415-568-3162
Public Library of Science


Drilling sumps can leak into surface water


The degradation of drilling sumps associated with hydrocarbon extraction can negatively affect aquatic ecosystems, according to new research published November 6th in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Joshua Thienpont and colleagues at Queen’s University and other institutions.

Hydrocarbons are a primary source of energy as combustible fuel. Although hydrocarbon exploration and extraction are profitable enterprises, hydrocarbons contribute to the formation of greenhouse gases and are therefore a major stressor to the environment.

During the process of exploring for hydrocarbons, drilling sumps are used to permanently store the waste associated with drilling. In the Mackenzie Delta region of Canada’s western Arctic, more than 150 drilling sumps were constructed for this purpose. Although the areas surrounding the sumps were believed to be frozen by the surrounding permafrost, recent findings suggest that these areas may actually be thawing. In this study, the authors examine the environmental effects of this type of drilling sump containment loss in the Mackenzie Delta.

Because drilling fluids are saline, they tested whether leakage to surface waters was occurring by measuring changes in conductivity, as saline is more conductive than pure water. They also hypothesized that if saline-rich wastes from drilling sumps were impacting lakes, there should be changes in the types of life forms present. Zooplankton, for example, are a key component of aquatic ecosystems and various species survive differently in saline versus fresh water.



Through an analysis of lake sediments, they found changes in the community composition of zooplankton due to sump degradation. These results suggest that climate change and permafrost thaw can have deleterious consequences to aquatic life through the degradation and leaking of drilling sumps.

Thienpont elaborates, “The leaching of wastes from drilling sumps represents a newly identified example of one of the cumulative impacts of recent climate change impacting the sensitive freshwater ecosystems of the Arctic.”

###

Citation: Thienpont JR, Kokelj SV, Korosi JB, Cheng ES, Desjardins C, et al. (2013) Exploratory Hydrocarbon Drilling Impacts to Arctic Lake Ecosystems. PLoS ONE 8(11): e78875. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078875

Financial Disclosure: This work was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada through Discovery grants to MFJP, JMB and JPS, and an NSERC Northern Supplement to MFJP. The Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP) also provided logistical support to MFJP. The cumulative impact monitoring program (CIMP) provided support for collection of water chemistry results. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interest Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

PLEASE LINK TO THE SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT (URL goes live after the embargo ends): http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0078875

Disclaimer: This press release refers to upcoming articles in PLOS ONE. The releases have been provided by the article authors and/or journal staff. Any opinions expressed in these are the personal views of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of PLOS. PLOS expressly disclaims any and all warranties and liability in connection with the information found in the release and article and your use of such information.

About PLOS ONE: PLOS ONE is the first journal of primary research from all areas of science to employ a combination of peer review and post-publication rating and commenting, to maximize the impact of every report it publishes. PLOS ONE is published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS), the open-access publisher whose goal is to make the world’s scientific and medical literature a public resource.

All works published in PLOS ONE are Open Access. Everything is immediately availableto read, download, redistribute, include in databases and otherwise usewithout cost to anyone, anywhere, subject only to the condition that the original authors and source are properly attributed. For more information about PLOS ONE relevant to journalists, bloggers and press officers, including details of our press release process and our embargo policy, see the everyONE blog at http://everyone.plos.org/media.



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AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.


Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/plos-dfh110513.php
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